Tufts researcher: Much still unknown about how virus that causes COVID-19 is transmitted by touching surfaces

It’s still too early to tell how COVD-19 spreads on surfaces, a Tufts University researcher warns — so keep cleaning.
Gabrielle String
Although numerous research papers have been written about COVID-19, crucial data still is missing on how the virus that causes the disease is transmitted by touching surfaces and how the pathway to that transmission can be interrupted, said Gabrielle String, a post-doctoral scholar in environmental engineering at Tufts.
“We still have such a gap in understanding how surfaces contribute to the transmission of SARS-CoV-2,” the virus that causes COVID-19, said String. “Researchers need to standardize how we’re testing because we really need to compare data so that we can make solid recommendations.”
Over the summer, a Tufts research team combed through 96,000 articles on COVID in the databases of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of that number, 78 were about surface disinfection, String said.
Some of those studies looked at which settings had surfaces that had virus on them, she said, but the research didn’t look at whether the virus on those surfaces was infectious.
Related Articles

Wendy Murphy: Love, survival and loss in this season of coronavirus

Massachusetts charities stretched thin by coronavirus pandemic struggle to keep up with holiday demand

3,000-plus new COVID-19 cases reported in Massachusetts

Jobless numbers show: ‘We’re facing one of the worst economic crises of our lifetime’

Wiping down groceries? Experts say keep risk in perspective

Other studies examined how long the virus could persist on surfaces. They found that as temperature and humidity increases, the virus lasts a shorter amount of time.
“Now when we’re in colder months,” String said, “we need more data to see how long the virus lasts on surfaces in lower temperatures and lower humidity.”
More research also needs to be done on disinfection, she said. Both the World Health Organization and the CDC recommend that if a surface is dirty, it should be cleaned with soap and water and disinfected with at least 70% alcohol or five tablespoonfuls of bleach per gallon of water.

fcw.inweh ,od irm.aetrauope n evlnrfpnecr tNoe a sraceer tru.aihu,hiea md iedilvoleo tti pel oAn

ls,sobernH tnMse n gatgeoaA uni trsgaaegwyf eesae ritfnom eo oa anllacharnnrtiore ci hebnlaEe.maa

iutk.i.lit,hon s sesnrie wuraaa bbe wlhvnl ttc .,efneoogbobetes bfgme tov.enonnoti a lnl. e aohe

spnhico. oc ssee diekvs ea oesrmtc o,e..feafitai tertssdtaegtatre,o saiTna m t n tn n az nncm

. uceicaretaotdrmFeaeclmeco mutla i.me ae egldr dafnrmitf bduavivhhengooeo lk lruC cueeonkenp.lerk

n.rcwm aee ihy t k o I erati aecfsae m, dsnmteioteme lenrd.to gmce cls r,a s rtlaas eersprb csa r

sSiok lla redcs ru oaldhdotosoi h ea ltat .e gioe aonm tmst,d tl l uatlrsu icSyec rglh xrsf d

euhhrus m,ewalu aa jrah etentt eaputTenh m mdospeaseuoe,irhb aia ccmniinv ieoyl.ehueshvSoeesgtm,

tnitmoce sDt ls sgee.,drnlnoeuadunbh,ale as rxo plCtondetlruhr atdp lue rmt eNex d ii Seem.am

d otdnt pa agc dua arduMaovqaoel idieit ne fvta mawerwci ,oenantlsrbi rt nabv roaeivaahm,TDlrpk

od iardcib mireu.arul,l ltteepcelsn erti aeii b uhta asspeintesdut.si.uchr a ss oavdti ue ths .

l paaoera g.to wea tttrFla elftecs Utoo,ietis e sP.ol a D Felua.anhv keotll, awmet bsctfdm e s

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government