Illinois reports 7,037 new COVID-19 cases, 96 deaths as positivity rate falls (LIVE UPDATES)

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

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Illinois reports 7,037 new COVID-19 cases, 96 deaths as positivity rate falls

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

State health officials Thursday said another 7,037 people in Illinois have tested positive for the coronavirus, slashing the state’s testing positivity rate to its lowest point since late October.
That positivity rate — which measures the rate of spread of the virus — now has been cut nearly in half, to 7.2%, from its most recent peak in mid-November. But it’s still higher than the summertime average positivity rate of 3.7%.
The dip was partially a result of a hefty 94,909 test results submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health — the highest daily test count since last week.
The state this week averaged about 85,000 tests performed per day.
Reporter David Struett has the full story.

News
1:29 p.m. Republicans block $2,000 coronavirus checks despite Trump demand

AP
A view of the White House, Tuesday in Washington.

House Republicans shot down a Democratic bid on Thursday to pass President Donald Trump’s longshot, end-of-session demand for $2,000 direct payments to most Americans as he ponders whether to sign a long-overdue COVID-19 relief bill.
The made-for-TV clash came as the Democratic-controlled chamber convened for a pro forma session scheduled in anticipation of a smooth Washington landing for the massive, year-end legislative package, which folds together a $1.4 trillion governmentwide spending with the hard-fought COVID-19 package and dozens of unrelated but bipartisan bills.
Instead, Thursday’s unusual 12-minute House session instead morphed into unconvincing theater in response to Trump’s veto musings about the package, which was negotiated by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Trump’s behalf. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, the No. 2 House Democrat, sought the unanimous approval of all House members to pass the bill, but GOP leader Kevin McCarthy, who was not present in the nearly-empty chamber, denied his approval and the effort fizzled.
Read the full story here.
9:14 a.m. Follow the science? It’s not that easy when deciding when — or if — to reopen schools
In March, a single case of the coronavirus in a Northwest Side school led Chicago Public Schools officials to close it.
By July, after the governor had shuttered all Illinois schools for the spring, CPS said its buildings would reopen in the fall as long as daily caseloads in the city were below 400 or test positivity was under 8% — a threshold that wasn’t met.
In November, as officials announced plans to reopen in the new year, they said the only metric stopping them would be if cases in the city started to double fewer than every 18 days.
City officials have attributed the changing thresholds to evolving science. They’ve explained that better recommendations are possible as more data becomes available and that studies have shown that schools don’t appear to be superspreaders when strict mitigation is in place.
Reporter Nader Issa has more.

New Cases

Illinois public health officials reported 6,239 new COVID-19 cases diagnosed among 84,764 tests, lowering the state’s average positivity rate over the last week to 7.4%.

Illinois surpassed 900,000 coronavirus cases Sunday

Analysis & Commentary

10:13 a.m. 2020 in hindsight: What will this year look like a century from now?
Finally, we can say it: 2020 is almost over. Good riddance.
As we look to finally bring a close to this annus horribilis, America will be living amid the detritus for years — a devastating economic downturn, a generation of students behind in education, the collective psychic trauma of prolonged isolation. 2020 will be hard to forget.
But in 100 years, when those of us who lived through the year that everything stopped have died out, how will future generations look back on what happened? How will history be able to encapsulate just how crazy 2020 was?
We can only imagine an encyclopedia entry from 2120.
The Year 2020:
2020 was marked by a global pandemic called COVID-19, which was responsible for killing nearly 2 million people worldwide. 2020 has since been dubbed “The Lost Year,” due to nationwide shutdowns of travel, business, school and life as it was previously known.
Read S.E. Cupp’s full column here.

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Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

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